Chris Bunch - 2022 Forward


OrangeExtremist

Active member
I understand players being able to profit off their NIL, but it’s still illegal for boosters to outright pay kids to attend their alma mater, right? Even with NIL, this would still be considered an improper inducement or an illegal “pay for play”. The NIL agreement is supposed to be commensurate with fair market value. Now I’m sure that some schools or boosters are flirting with skirting the rules, but we aren’t suggesting that Syracuse do that and run the risk of facing sanctions while the involved players are declared ineligible, are we? If other schools are doing it, let them face the eventual crackdown. Am I being naive? Or is the NCAA totally turning a blind eye? I know their power seems to be getting reduced by the powerful conferences, but this will certainly ruin college basketball if the inmates are allowed to run the asylum.
I understand players being able to profit off their NIL, but it’s still illegal for boosters to outright pay kids to attend their alma mater, right? Even with NIL, this would still be considered an improper inducement or an illegal “pay for play”. The NIL agreement is supposed to be commensurate with fair market value. Now I’m sure that some schools or boosters are flirting with skirting the rules, but we aren’t suggesting that Syracuse do that and run the risk of facing sanctions while the involved players are declared ineligible, are we? If other schools are doing it, let them face the eventual crackdown. Am I being naive? Or is the NCAA totally turning a blind eye? I know their power seems to be getting reduced by the powerful conferences, but this will certainly ruin college basketball if the inmates are allowed to run the asylum.

It is Illegal by NCAA rules. The problem is after the Supreme Court took the case on capping educational expenses for college athletes they likened the NCAA to a business and held them to business laws in the United States. Every court room in the country now is gonna go off of the Supreme Courts precedent. The American anti trust act says that businesses cannot artificially cap a market. So you can’t have every restaurant owner in Syracuse getting together and saying “we will all only pay $10 to cooks and not any more”. That is illegal for businesses to do in the United States. If the ncaa is considered a business in the court room they can’t do it either. So getting all the universitys together about capping NIL as a pay for play are illegal as long as they are considered a business. They know it is. They know they would lose in court. That’s why it’s not being policed. Because if they come down on it and it gets appealed they will lose.

The NCAA is playing a game right now. They don’t want to pay players out of their own bottom line. They don’t want to provide insurance. So they are staying away from the court room at all costs. This is being pushed by presidents and ADs. So they catch something and throw a “probation” penalty at it. So basically nothing. So that the court room can’t test the legality of their rules. Which are illegal. Lots of schools understand this. Syracuse does not.

The Supreme Court explicitly told the NCAA to either get Congress to pass a law to make their practices legal or collectively bargain with the players. They have done neither. So are they gonna go back to the Supreme Court and say “yeah you know that stuff you told us to do? We just ignored it.” They want to stay out of the court room.

The pay for play rules quite frankly do not matter. That’s why it’s openly being ignored by every SEC school, Louisville, Notre Dame, Duke, and even Rutgers. Everyone is doing it except us.

It feels like not participating in the college football arms race all over again.
 

OrangeExtremist

Active member
It was reported that Caleb Williams was offered $2 mill to play at Georgia. The next day he was in the portal. Quinn Ewers got $4 mill the day he committed to Texas. Without ever playing a snap. They aren’t even hiding the ball. Rutgers paid for a quarterback. They are doing nothing about it. And will continue to do nothing about it.
 

ThePearl

Active member
The first block is of Kansas commit Grady Dick (incredible shooter) and the second is of Kentucky commit Chris Livingston. Although Chris needs to become more involved inside, he does not shy away from going up against the future NBA talent that’s throughout the NIBC. Livingston is a 5-star bruiser who had a breakaway dunk and Chris chased him down from the side and timed his run to meet him at the rim. I like that Chris plays with a little cockiness and an edge.
 

MikeMcAllister

Administrator
Staff member
The first block is of Kansas commit Grady Dick (incredible shooter) and the second is of Kentucky commit Chris Livingston. Although Chris needs to become more involved inside, he does not shy away from going up against the future NBA talent that’s throughout the NIBC. Livingston is a 5-star bruiser who had a breakaway dunk and Chris chased him down from the side and timed his run to meet him at the rim. I like that Chris plays with a little cockiness and an edge.
Syracuse can certainly use an influx of that type of athleticism.
 

OrangeExtremist

Active member
Pearl question for you. Since I don’t have the same basketball eye. Growing up we “always recruited to fit our zone”. We have gotten away from that to improve our offense. And you can see that on the court. We used to win games 52-45 now it’s easy to have both teams in the 80s for points. Are we getting back to our zone recruiting roots with this class? Long, athletic.
 

ThePearl

Active member
Yes, these recruits are all long and athletic. I wouldn't call Taylor or Copeland especially quick for ACC guards, neither has an explosive first step. But just their length and overall athleticism are made for the zone. Taylor is a good defender in the man in high school right now, knows how to play defense and he moves pretty well laterally. Copeland is often a disinterested defender in high school (very common). He'll quickly learn at SU that won't get him on the court. But he is uncommonly big for a point guard and not just Michael Carter-Williams big, he has very long arms and a lot of bulk to him that MCW didn't have. Once he commits to playing D in the zone, he could be a massive defender at the top of it, denying entry passes and picking balls off with his very good hands. Bunch is perfect for the zone, long, quick and he will defend the rim. He's better suited for the zone than he is playing man, and he has been a better, more active defender in recent games, getting down lower and showing good lateral quickness. Brown is not especially quick but he's not slow and moves pretty well for a guy his size. With his length, shot blocking, hustle, and smarts, he could be very good in the zone. And just from the few clips I've seen, Carey is perfect for a center who has to sometimes cover the corner three. He looks unusually quick and agile for someone close to seven feet.

Also, as a unit, this class is made for running on the fast break. All five are strong in attacking the rim and they all want to dunk. Copeland is an improvisational point guard better suited for the open court than half court sets. Bunch can fly down the court and finish with his head almost at the rim (I think his head clipped the bottom of the backboard in a recent game). Taylor is a very good leaper who can go strong to the basket or be a trailing three point shooter. Brown is an excellent rebounder and outlet passer and he gets down the court pretty well and is a very good finisher with excellent hands. Carey can fly down the court. I would love to see us become a running team again, but that takes the rebounding that we've lacked in recent years.

I don't want to get my hopes up too high. There's no sure big time star and it's a huge leap to college and there's always recruits who never pan out and others who take two or three years to really develop. But this class is full of Syracuse-style players.
 

MikeMcAllister

Administrator
Staff member
Yes, these recruits are all long and athletic. I wouldn't call Taylor or Copeland especially quick for ACC guards, neither has an explosive first step. But just their length and overall athleticism are made for the zone. Taylor is a good defender in the man in high school right now, knows how to play defense and he moves pretty well laterally. Copeland is often a disinterested defender in high school (very common). He'll quickly learn at SU that won't get him on the court. But he is uncommonly big for a point guard and not just Michael Carter-Williams big, he has very long arms and a lot of bulk to him that MCW didn't have. Once he commits to playing D in the zone, he could be a massive defender at the top of it, denying entry passes and picking balls off with his very good hands. Bunch is perfect for the zone, long, quick and he will defend the rim. He's better suited for the zone than he is playing man, and he has been a better, more active defender in recent games, getting down lower and showing good lateral quickness. Brown is not especially quick but he's not slow and moves pretty well for a guy his size. With his length, shot blocking, hustle, and smarts, he could be very good in the zone. And just from the few clips I've seen, Carey is perfect for a center who has to sometimes cover the corner three. He looks unusually quick and agile for someone close to seven feet.

Also, as a unit, this class is made for running on the fast break. All five are strong in attacking the rim and they all want to dunk. Copeland is an improvisational point guard better suited for the open court than half court sets. Bunch can fly down the court and finish with his head almost at the rim (I think his head clipped the bottom of the backboard in a recent game). Taylor is a very good leaper who can go strong to the basket or be a trailing three point shooter. Brown is an excellent rebounder and outlet passer and he gets down the court pretty well and is a very good finisher with excellent hands. Carey can fly down the court. I would love to see us become a running team again, but that takes the rebounding that we've lacked in recent years.

I don't want to get my hopes up too high. There's no sure big time star and it's a huge leap to college and there's always recruits who never pan out and others who take two or three years to really develop. But this class is full of Syracuse-style players.
Great analysis
 

ThePearl

Active member
Chris is currently playing against top team Sunrise Christian. After going 0-6 from three yesterday, he went 0-4 in the first half today. He came out firing in the second half, missed his first, then hit the next four in a few minutes. There was an unusual sequence where he chased down a ball with his back to the basket about ten feet out. He had a wide open ten-footer but instead ran straight to his favorite spot, the left corner, turned and drained another three. He does not lack confidence. He has length, bounce, quickness and a sweet shooting touch when he has time to set his feet. And he can score in...bunches. Both his game and his performance are very uneven right now, but the long-term ceiling at SU is high.
 

ThePearl

Active member
Wasatch was down 18 early but hung in there, closing it to ten at the half despite Chris not scoring. He was a big part of Wasatch's comeback against the team that was ranked #1 in the country last week, scoring 16 in the second half. (Sunrise has forward Mark Mitchell, who has been regarded as the fourth best Duke recruit. I don't think so, not after seeing parts of several Sunrise Christian games. He might be as good or better than all of them, he is a great great player. A year and a half from now, Duke could have three of the top half dozen or so picks in the NBA draft with Whitehead, Lively, and Mitchell.)

I will say this about Bunch--the competition he goes against in the NIBC is the best you can get. He has usually had his weak games against the hyper talented NIBC, while usually having his big games against the more regional teams they also play. A player like Maliq Brown will have a major adjustment when going up against college players instead of his high school opponents. Not Chris. He's going against the very best kids in his class and he is not intimidated. I never get the feeling he plays hesitant or scared, he thinks he's as good as they are.
 
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